keeper of lost things review
Books

The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

This is simply a beautifully written book about redemption. The story is set in the current day in London, where an old man, Anthony Peardew, collects objects lost or misplaced in the streets, trains, parks, etc. Around these objects, Anthony creates stories about how they got lost, no matter how twisted and dark they can get. This specific aspect of the book reminds the reader, no matter how mundane they may be, of what others can go through in a lifetime. Anthony believes that all these objects mean something to someone and must be returned. When Anthony passes away (this is not a spoiler, it’s in the blurb), he gives his house along with all its ‘lost things’ to his helper and assistant Laura; a recently divorced middle-aged woman trying to start her life afresh. In his will, he asks her to return all the lost things back to their owners.

This is where the story begins, and it gets good. You follow Laura as she forms new relationships with Anthony’s gardener, and the neighbour’s daughter, a nine-teen-year-old, wholesome girl with down syndrome, or, as she loves to say it ‘dancing drome’. In all the books I’ve read, she has probably been my favourite or one of my favourite female characters.

I loved how the story tied in together. You get flashbacks in the point of view of different characters, and although they don’t relate to the main characters in any way, it all ties in beautifully with the main plot of the story. Each character has a defined backstory. You’re not left asking yourself who they are or what their role is. They feel real, especially with the kinds of relationships they have with each other. They react in ways that you’d expect to react in those certain situations.

The book included mystery, romance, a little bit of thrill, and boy was it a rollercoaster of emotions. It had me smiling, borderline crying, and full out crying when I actually finished it. It was wholesome and just a lovely read. I loved how the story went full circle, how the ending made it seem like these characters were even more alive. Some of the seemingly secondary characters, ended up having a much bigger role in the story than expected.

Here’s something I didn’t like about the book. The main character, Laura, for me, was difficult to love. Although she’s a likable character, I couldn’t relate to her because I am much younger and haven’t had any experiences similar to hers. She could irritate me sometimes, and she would do or say things that to me, seemed like complete overreactions to the situation.

I also thought the book was a little bit creepy at some points, and I don’t like that about books. I read every night before going to bed, so if I’m going to read something that’s going to creep me out in the dark, I’d rather skip over it. But although some parts were creepy, it wasn’t scary, and it made sense with the story that came along with it, and the way everything came together in the end, made reading those creepy bits worthwhile.

I think someone who’s into romance and just a really wholesome story about redemption would really enjoy this book. Everything made sense, there were no plot holes, and overall it was an incredibly beautiful and enjoyable read. I think this book is perfect for all adults and could be stretched for young adults too. I’d definitely recommend you giving it a read.

If you are interested in reading this book, be sure to grab a paperback or hardcover copy (UK).

If you’re in the US, you can get a paperback or a hardcover as linked.

J.D.

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jdcynth@gmail.com

Comments



Dan
13 December 2020 at 6:44 pm

Great review!

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Antara
13 December 2020 at 7:48 pm

Beautifully written review! Makes me want to read the book, too!

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